SmartHan Rice Tubes Offer Japanese New Way to Snack! Is This the End of Onigiri?

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Tired of stuffing rice balls in your bag only to have them get squished and smear sticky rice all over your important work documents?

Takara Tomy Arts is here to answer your plea with SmartHan (han means “rice”), a revolutionary new way to enjoy your favorite rice dish from home while on the go!

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Onigiri without the nigiri – Japan’s traditional rice balls get an update

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onigirazuOnigiri are rice balls, and they’re basically the Japanese version of sandwiches. They’re a fast, convenient snack that you can eat without getting your hands messy, and they’ve been a staple of Japanese lunches since medieval times. But now there’s a hip new version that’s trying to take over from the long-established practice of molding the rice by hand.

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New dry cleaning service for cosplayers promises to look after even the most extreme costumes

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No one likes to air their dirty laundry for all the world to see, and cosplayers, with their intricate and often home-made threads, can be especially sensitive when handing over their unusual wares to dry cleaners accustomed to dealing with more ‘ordinary’ customers.

Now cosplayers from Hokkaido to Okinawa can avoid judgemental glances at the local dry cleaners thanks to a special online service that caters exclusively to their needs. From professional cleaning to costume storage, this is the type of support every cosplay-loving individual has ever dreamed of!

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This huge shank of anime meat is actually a sweet dessert

I should get my future husband to make this for me

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Anime meat looks delicious and grotesque at the same time. It almost always makes you hunger for a big turkey leg because of how perfectly it’s drawn – like how hamburgers look on the McDonald’s menu – but then it’s got the two bones sticking out of it, as though someone just savagely tore the leg off of some poor, frightened animal, bone and all.

Which seems entirely possible considering that everyone in an anime universe is as strong as an ox. Maybe they gain their power by killing and eating the hearts and leg bones of said oxen.

Anyway, a baumkuchen manufacturer in Japan realized that with the sweet, dense cake dessert popular throughout Europe and Japan, they could almost perfectly recreate a cartoony anime meat shank and the below “Manga Niku” baumkuchen was born.

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Cookie Mail: The tastiest way to send an important message!

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With all the different ways to stay in touch these days–from text messages to email to tweets to late night drunk dials-it often feels like we’re losing out on making real connections with people. At least, that’s what the grumpy TV pundits tell us, and maybe they’re right. After all, when was the last time you sat down and thought out a nice, sincere message, instead of just dashing off a quick “I C, LOL, KTHNXBAI, TTYL”?

Some of you may even be so young that you don’t remember getting letters in the mail!

Well, despite the grumblings of elder generations, that old form of communication is almost gone, but there is one last bastion of hope for all the letter writers out there: Cookie Mail!

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The “will boyfriend”: A new title in Japan’s evolving dating scene

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The Japanese language takes a lot of cues from English when it comes to talking about romance. For example, “kisu”, the corrupted pronunciation of “kiss,” is about 100 times more common than “kuchitzuke,” the purely Japanese word for locking lips. Found the love of your life? Then it’s time to puropozu (propose), and when your bride walks down the aisle, she’ll probably be wearing a uedingu doresu (wedding dress).

Still, sometimes Japanese goes its own way, and while “boyfriend” and “girlfriend” are pretty readily understood, the indigenous terms kare and kanojo are much more widely used. And every now and again, the two languages get mixed together to describe something in the Japanese dating scene, such as with the newly coined phrase uiru kare, or “will boyfriend.”

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